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What say you when you encounter this?

Adair Inspection

Well-Known Community Member
NACBI Member
#2
when owners are unwilling to address the real moisture intrusion issues properly & slather paint aka lipstick on a pig these are the inevitable results
the masonry will continue to deteriorate & the interior ugliness will continue to peel & contaminate the indoor air quality

or they just need a new interior decorator

if your area is anything like mine the moisture & urban gentrification will assure that structure doesn't see another 150 yrs
 
Last edited:

Bill Warner

Administrator
Staff member
NACBI Member
#3
when owners are unwilling to address the real moisture intrusion issues properly & slather paint aka lipstick on a pig these are the inevitable results
the masonry will continue to deteriorate & the interior ugliness will continue to peel & contaminate the indoor air quality

or they just need a new interior decorator

if your area is anything like mine the moisture & urban gentrification will assure that structure doesn't see another 150 yrs
Precisely BA!
Many of these historic buildings are crumbling because of cheap owners employing cheap cosmetics to the exteriors in attempt to kick the can down the road to the next owner... This one has a chance, but only if immediate corrective action is taken.

They use common paint that is vapor impermeable. The paint doesn't stick well to the masonry and allows moisture to penetrate, but not escape. The water can be from a multitude of sources such as poorly maintained gutter systems, poor flashing, roof leaks, and through the wall itself. It's only natural route to drying is vapor and moisture migration through the multi wye brick to the interior, resulting initially in what is depicted at the interior stair well. Eventually the masonry begins to crumble on the outside as it decays, they apply more paint to hide the ugliness, and the cycle continues.
Vapor permeable products have been available to seal the exterior masonry, but allow it to breath. Unfortunately the building owners and many painting contractors are ignorant as to their existence... or simply don't wish to pay to have it done correctly.
 

Chuck Forman

Community Post Master
NACBI Member
#5
Just saw it today. CMU structure, low sloped roof with parapet walls and a ton of efflorescence on the interior wall. All due to improper/inadequate maintenance on the exterior of the structure. Property manager onsite with us said "Oh, thats old. We repaired the problem and just didn't get around to cleaning up and repainting the interior wall". Wasn't happy when I showed her the picture in my thermal camera and then verified it with a moisture meter. Darn, that bad luck!
 

Ray Thoroman

Community Post Master
NACBI Member
#6
Agree Bill. We/I run across this in older structures. We recommend what you explained and a ''historical preservation contractor''. You ask do they exist? Yes, but far a few between. I've see brick/masonry so soft it just flakes off with your finger.

Then you take into account plaster, modern central HVAC systems, stack effect, other building materials and all play a role. It's a shame because I like to see these old buildings and would like to see them preserved. Unfortunately the owners like to stick tenants in there and just care about ROI.