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Adair Inspection offers North Central Texas Construction Phase Inspections...

Adair Inspection

Well-Known Community Member
NACBI Member
and more!

This is another common find.

All newer garage doors with operators installed are required to reverse when impacting an object not in the sight of the motion sensors, say hands or feet or a child playing outside or your vehicle is partially pulled inside the garage but the tires do not obstruct the motion sensor, you get the picture.

One of the garage door operator tests performed that many inspectors have had to pay claims due to damaging owner's property is the 2x4 test placing said 2x4 on the floor in the path of the closing garage door, auto reverse is supposed to occur but often doesn't and the door gets damaged.

Smart inspectors wear Crocs so this damage doesn't occur.

A redundant question here:
What do you think will happen to any object or doing the 2x4 test?
GD entrapment.JPG

answer is object will be crushed or door damage will occur co$ting the in$pector a good portion of today's wage
 
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Terry Clayton

Community Post Master
NACBI Member
You need to start a list of amazing uses for crocks, next best thing to duct tape!
 

Dale Duffy

Administrator
Staff member
NACBI Member
I always perform the test by hand. If I can't catch the door and make it reverse then it needs adjustment.
Chuck,

I use the same method, one folded on me a while back.

Something lodged (I have no idea what occurred), the opener kept pushing the door down after it tried to reverse, the track bent upward till it touched the drywall ceiling, the door panels buckled. Everything was a twisted mess. I even pulled the emergency release, it didn't disengage the door from the track.

I told the homeowner the door opener failed the test.....:D

Never heard another word about it, but to this day, I'm not sure what really happened.
 
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Chuck Forman

Community Post Master
NACBI Member
I know how you feel. I was testing one by hand one day and the thing detached from the door header. Spent the next 30 minutes putting it back up. That door failed on the report as well but I had to put it back up so the homeowner could get back in their garage.
 

John Bowman

Administrator
Staff member
NACBI Member
No crocks here. I used a "whoopie" cushion. Demented as i am....I found it funny every time. Homeowners/Prospective Buyers found it so amusing that I almost bought cases of them with advertising, but the cost was out of this world.
 

Adair Inspection

Well-Known Community Member
NACBI Member
jwir
No crocks here. I used a "whoopie" cushion. Demented as i am....I found it funny every time. Homeowners/Prospective Buyers found it so amusing that I almost bought cases of them with advertising, but the cost was out of this world.
Bman & I thought I was cheap... ;~)) if they provided any real resistance and maintained the required 2" height I'd be in
 

MarcelCyr

Community Post Master
NACBI Member
and more!

This is another common find.

All newer garage doors with operators installed are required to reverse when impacting an object not in the sight of the motion sensors, say hands or feet or a child playing outside or your vehicle is partially pulled inside the garage but the tires do not obstruct the motion sensor, you get the picture.

One of the garage door operator tests performed that many inspectors have had to pay claims due to damaging owner's property is the 2x4 test placing said 2x4 on the floor in the path of the closing garage door, auto reverse is supposed to occur but often doesn't and the door gets damaged.

Smart inspectors wear Crocs so this damage doesn't occur.

A redundant question here:
What do you think will happen to any object or doing the 2x4 test?
View attachment 107

answer is object will be crushed or door damage will occur co$ting the in$pector a good portion of today's wage

Been saying that for years Barry, but no one wants to listen.
The 2x4 is for a new installation by expert installers.


We as inspectors need only inspect for the functionality of the safety features. Thus, by hand only and prior to that, a little knowledge of overhead door hardware and proper assembly of.

That is always a big help.

 

Adair Inspection

Well-Known Community Member
NACBI Member
Duff
if i can't remember
it must not have been
 

Adair Inspection

Well-Known Community Member
NACBI Member
Been saying that for years Barry, but no one wants to listen.
The 2x4 is for a new installation by expert installers.


We as inspectors need only inspect for the functionality of the safety features. Thus, by hand only and prior to that, a little knowledge of overhead door hardware and proper assembly of.

That is always a big help.
Marcel
Understood but a good portion of my biz is Phase Inspections for new build including Finals and we all know the installers don't always do their jobs properly.
That's why I still have my job. ;~))

Duff
yep been raining for over 24hrs & another 24hrs expected
i've had to backwash twice as the rainfall input is more than the overflow can relieve
 

Dale Duffy

Administrator
Staff member
NACBI Member
Been saying that for years Barry, but no one wants to listen.
The 2x4 is for a new installation by expert installers.


We as inspectors need only inspect for the functionality of the safety features. Thus, by hand only and prior to that, a little knowledge of overhead door hardware and proper assembly of.

That is always a big help.
I've seen someone place the 2x4 on end, giving the door 3.5 inches of solid wrinkle-ability.
 

Adair Inspection

Well-Known Community Member
NACBI Member

Bill Warner

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