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NACBI members provide Aerial Thermography for flat roof scans and other building diagnostics!

Terry Clayton

Community Post Master
NACBI Member
#21
Very cool, Has any consideration for pricing and how we will handle getting it in motion if there is an interested client.
 

Bill Warner

Administrator
Staff member
NACBI Member
#23
It's still available Brian; however, this isn't a "loaner" type program. We've partnered with a company who provides the pilot, equipment, and process... and we provide the knowledge to interpret the data and tweak the images.
 

Bill Warner

Administrator
Staff member
NACBI Member
#25
If I were to seek out this type of work, what would the process look like?
  1. We put you in contact with the company so you can provide them with the project details
  2. They put together a bid for the job
  3. You add a small markup to keep it competitive
  4. You get the job
  5. They perform the aerial scan
  6. They get the images to me or Dave Andersen for analysis and editing
  7. We send the images back to them and they compile a single mosaic image (called an "orthomosaic") with their software out of the multiple images
  8. A report is compiled and sent to client.
Depending on the scope, further inspections (physically traversing the roof, core sampling, hand held thermal imaging, etc.) may be necessary to confirm the data gathered. This is discussed with the client upfront to provide them options to consider. Otherwise, the aerial scan alone is simply providing them data that indicates "possible" concern areas with a whole bunch of CYA verbiage indicating the need for further close inspections, core sampling, etc.

Hope this helps explain a bit.
 

Jeffrey R Jonas

Active Community Member
NACBI Member
#26
  1. We put you in contact with the company so you can provide them with the project details
  2. They put together a bid for the job
  3. You add a small markup to keep it competitive
  4. You get the job
  5. They perform the aerial scan
  6. They get the images to me or Dave Andersen for analysis and editing
  7. We send the images back to them and they compile a single mosaic image (called an "orthomosaic") with their software out of the multiple images
  8. A report is compiled and sent to client.
Depending on the scope, further inspections (physically traversing the roof, core sampling, hand held thermal imaging, etc.) may be necessary to confirm the data gathered. This is discussed with the client upfront to provide them options to consider. Otherwise, the aerial scan alone is simply providing them data that indicates "possible" concern areas with a whole bunch of CYA verbiage indicating the need for further close inspections, core sampling, etc.

Hope this helps explain a bit.
Great info Bill.
What would the "typical" timeframe be, going from #4 thru #8 (for an average, everyday building)?
 

Bill Warner

Administrator
Staff member
NACBI Member
#27
Great info Bill.
What would the "typical" timeframe be, going from #4 thru #8 (for an average, everyday building)?
First and foremost it would depend on prevailing weather conditions to ensure ideal conditions for the aerial scan.
But barring mother nature holding anything back, the scan/flight typically occurs in one evening.
The sample image in this post was done with Art Schlangen over in Indianapolis. This is where the sample image in this original post came from. It was two days later I had the original unedited images available for analysis and editing. I tweaked a couple images and set the span identical for all the rest, and had them turned back around in a couple hours. The final composite image (orthomosaic) was put together and sent back to us later that day or first thing the next.
So all in all, it's a pretty fast process, and not much different than a "boots on the roof" type inspection.

To get an idea of what goes into this, the final composite image we have as a sample is the result of stitching together over 130 separate images the drone and pilot captured.
When doing jobs such as this, we set the client's expectations ahead of time to expect finished product within 5-7 business days after the scan is performed. But typically delivered within 3-5...
Under-promise and over-deliver! ;)
 
#29
Roofing consultants that I have talked to regarding IR scans on typical TPO and Derbigum Acrylic roofing membranes, have said that these high white materials are so reflective, that they cannot be surveyed.
High dollar cameras for walkover only. Maybe there have been advances in value engineering this devices but I have not heard of drone mounted or hand helds that won't take your lunch money.
 

Bill Warner

Administrator
Staff member
NACBI Member
#30
Roofing consultants that I have talked to regarding IR scans on typical TPO and Derbigum Acrylic roofing membranes, have said that these high white materials are so reflective, that they cannot be surveyed.
High dollar cameras for walkover only. Maybe there have been advances in value engineering this devices but I have not heard of drone mounted or hand helds that won't take your lunch money.
Hello Edward,

Thank you for your comment!
TPO, PVC, and similar roof membranes are indeed very reflective. So is EPDM. They are difficult but certainly not impossible to survey accurately. It has been published and some certain standards of practice also suggest that the greater the angle of view, the less reflections will affect the survey. Thus, aerial thermal imaging is in fact ideally suited for these types of membranes under the right conditions. I have also heard of inspectors having great success utilizing short wave imagers as opposed to the more common mid or long wave imagers when conducting the survey from foot. Regardless, the more elevated the inspector's vantage point, the better these roof membranes can be surveyed via thermal imaging.
 
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